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Ypsilanti : In the News

152 Ypsilanti Articles | Page: | Show All

A conversation about affordable housing in Ann Arbor

Both Mark Maynard and the Metro Times have decided to tackle the issue of affordable housing - or rather the growing lack of such - in Ann Arbor. As usual their thoughts are both insightful and empathetic.

Excerpt from Mark Maynard:

"I don’t have any problem with affordable housing. I think it’s a good thing. What I have a real problem with, however, is segregation. I have a problem with a system where it’s accepted that some towns are “too nice” for the poor. And I find it doubly infuriating when these nice, liberal communities, once they’ve forced their most vulnerable citizens beyond their borders, mount campaigns to stop attempts at regional cooperation, as we recently saw play out in the battle over the AATA’s expanded role in providing bus service within Washtenaw County. Many people in Ann Arbor cried out that they didn’t want their tax dollars going to fund the transportation of people in Ypsilanti, in spite of the fact that many of those people were probably Ann Arborites before they were forced out due to the cost of living. And the same goes for everything from our public schools to our police departments."

Excerpt from the Metro Times:

"It's a good post, one that inspired a lot of people to join in with comments of their own. The general tone is one of despair at what Ann Arbor has become, how it has fallen from its days as a scrappy campus town with a good mix of incomes. After reading them, we come away agreeing that without lots of different kinds of people of different classes with different perspectives, a city is a less interesting place. As for subsidies, one needn't not have a job to not receive subsidies. The fact is, everybody in the United States gets some sort of subsidy, not just the odd person who makes it their life's work to avoid earning a living."


Read Mark's observations and opinions here.

Read the Metro Times respone here.
 

Local artist in the CriticCar spotlight

We've put our own spotlight on Cre Fuller and his fantastic Angry Tin Men in Concentrate in the past. Now, sporting a pair of award ribbons from Maker Faire, Detroit's CriticCar gets even more of his story.

Watch the video below.

 

Local mayoral candidates in the spotlight

It's primary season which means that in a mostly democratic town those seeking office tend to be determined in the dog days of summer primaries when voter turnout is low. Here's hoping that Concentrate readers turn out in higher percentages than the populace at large.

Ann Arbor News / mlive has a round up of links on how the candidates voted on various hot button issues here.

The Ann Arbor Chronicle explores what kinds of personas the candidates have carved out for themselves here.

The Ypsilanti Courier reports on mayoral forum here.

Ann Arbor News endorses Amanda Edmonds for Ypsilanti mayor here.

Ann Arbor News endorses Christopher Taylor for Ann Arbor mayor here.
 

St. Joseph's is tops for heart surgery

Usually it's ":U-M this. And U-M that." I'm sure St. Joe's in Ypsilanti is glad to get a piece of the limelight for a change.

Excerpt:

"St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor was named one of the top 15 hospitals in the country in Consumer Reports first-ever rating of hospitals in heart surgery.

More than 400 hospitals were rated in 45 states plus Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico based on data for two heart surgeries: surgical aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass graft surgery, an operation done to treat blocked coronary arteries."

Read the rest here.

Relive the glory of Totally Awesome Fest via Internet video

For 10 years now, Ypsilanti has been home to a sprawling DIY festival of art and music that takes over local venues, businesses and homes. It is known as Totally Awesome Fest and if you haven't had the privilege to attend, well, here's your chance to see what all the hubbub is about.

Watch it below...


A Totally Awesome Film from Adam Wright on Vimeo.


Ypsilanti DDA considers improvement funds for freight house

So close... the Friends of the Freight House are closing in on their funding target to properly rehab the hsitoric structure.

Excerpt:

"Currently, an estimated $300,000 is needed to address fire suppression, bathrooms and heating, ventilation and air conditioning issues that need to be fixed before the building can be occupied. Last week Ypsilanti City Council voted to approve $220,000 in funding for the project and an estimated $40,000 has also been committed by several other organizations."

Read the rest here.
 

EMU, U-M chosen for Google Community Leaders Program

EMU joins Wayne State University, the University of Michigan-Dearborn, and the University of Michigan for a Google-sponsored program that teaches search optimization and digital marketing experience to students in order to help them support local businesses.

Excerpt:

"Five Eastern Michigan University students have been accepted into Google's Community Leader's Program, a volunteer operation in which students help equip local small businesses and non-profits to compete in the digital age. The five EMU students, Mahdi Alkadib, Patrick Cotter, Joseph Wendl, Robert Larson, and Sean Tseng, will work with various local businesses and organizations throughout southeastern Michigan, introducing them to tactical Google tools like Google+, Google Apps, Google Analytics and Google AdWords."

Read the rest here.
 

Ypsilanti band takes on infamous park defiler

In answer to the unfortunate and sordid story that made national news (seriously, there aren't more important issues for news outlets to draw our attention to?), Black Jake and The Carnies have decided to take lemons and make, er, lemonade/ Or, at least, music.

Watch and listen below.

 

Ypsilanti's untold Native American past

Local blogger Mark Maynard has a fascinating interview with local historian Matthew Siegfried about Ypsilanti's indigenous past and the burial site found on the city's Water Street property. 

Excerpt:

"It’s important to emphasize that these groups had, and made, their own history. We know, for instance, that smallpox decimated the local Potawatomie villages 1752. And, in 1787, the disease struck the Wyandot villages. And another epidemic in 1813 further weakened an already hard hit population.

And the groups around Ypsilanti would have been active in the defining events of that era. They debated how to use the rivalries between the French, English, and later Americans, to protect and further their own interests. The Wyandot were particularly divided over these questions."

Read the rest here. It's pretty amazing stuff.
 

Ypsilanti Library gets graphic novel grant

You know grpahic novels (aka comic books) are finally being accepted as valid works of art when libraries get grants to start offering them.
 
Excerpt:
 
"The Ypsilanti District Library announced Thursday that it was one of two libraries in the nation to receive a $7,000 grant to increase its selection of graphic novels on the shelves.
 
The district was awarded the Will Eisner Graphic Novel Award from Eisner’s family foundation."
 
Read the rest here.
 
 

Local blogger takes on anti-transit groups

Blogger and Ypsilanti resident Mark Maynard is no stranger to Concentrate's pages. His sporadic Exit Interview series is about as good as it gets for a ground-view perspective of living in our communities. Lately, Maynard has cast his ear and eye on the fight over whether Ann Arbor Area Transit Authority should expand its service and those who oppose the idea.
 
Excerpt:
 
"I should know better than to try to make sense of the arguments being offered by the rag tag band anti-tax activists who have come together to fight the AAATA millage we’ll be voting on next month, but, when I heard that they’d launched a website, I thought that I’d check it out, and see if maybe they’d figured out a way, in the time since we last discussed this, to better articulate their concerns.
 
What I found, though, was an absolute mess… an intellectually inconsistent barrage of unsubstantiated nonsense."
 
Read the rest (and comments) here.
 
 

College towns like Ann Arbor beget more notable people

Why do famous folks come from college communities? Apparently it's a combination of nature (smart parents) and nurture (innovative environment). Or so says Wikipedia.
 
Excerpt:
 
"Another key element he adds is "exposure to early innovation," citing the businesses that take off in colleges and, particularly for notable musicians, the exposure to innovative record stores, concerts and radio stations.
 
He attributes exposure to ideas as key to the success of those born in cities. "It's much better to grow up around ideas than to grow up around backyards," Stephens-Davidowitz remarks."
 
Read and watch the rest here.

 

Ann Arbor area among happiest metros in the US

Though you might not know it reading the comment section of the local paper, Ann Arbor is a happy happy place.
 
Excerpt:
 
"Some metro areas scored higher than others for the different factors used to determine well-being. Ann Arbor, Mich., scored highest in life evaluation. Meanwhile, Honolulu, Hawaii, scored highest for emotional health and San Luis Obispo-Paso Robles in California scored highest for work environment. Holland-Grand Haven in Michigan scored highest for physical heath and access to basic necessities, and Salinas, Calif., scored highest for healthy behaviors."
 
Read the rest here.
 
 

Proponents of AATA transit expansion dissect opposition

On May 6 voters in Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti and Ypsilanti Township will decide whether to fund the AATA's plan to expand services. An opposition group has formed, making various claims about the millages failures and shortcomings. Blogger Mark Maynard brought together a trio of proponents to discuss their campaign.
 
Excerpt:
 
"The small but loud opposition relies on this argument to fire people up. “We don’t benefit, so we’ll vote no.” They present it as black and white, and ignore the general benefits, which are numerous. They don’t acknowledge the fact that mass transit alleviates road congestion, improves safety, makes parking spaces easier to come by, etc. If they don’t have a bus stop right outside their house, and routes that take them directly from their first appointment of the day to their last, and back home again, they’re completely against it. They’re demanding something of a bus service that’s just not realistic. The truth is, our local transit service has been continually improving (AirRide service to Detroit Metro Airport, expanded NightRide service, increased frequency of service on routes 4 and 5, etc.), and there will be even more options for people if this millage is passed"
 
Read the rest here.
 
 

Public input wanted on Ann Arbor transit routes

Transportation planners are interested in hearing from Ann Arborites about several proposed high capacity public transit connectors. 

Read and listen about here.
 
There's a presentation about the six potential routes here.
 
You can weigh by attending their public information meetings. The schedule is here.
 
 
152 Ypsilanti Articles | Page: | Show All
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